Hearing Loss Information

Hearing loss is a sudden or gradual decrease in how well you can hear. Depending on the cause, it can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent. Hearing loss can be categorized by which and what part of the auditory system is damaged. There are three basic types of hearing loss: Conductive hearing loss, Sensorineural hearing loss and Mixed hearing loss.

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Types Of Hearing Loss

Conductive Hearing Loss

Conductive hearing loss occurs when sound is not conducted efficiently thought the outer ear canal to the eardrum.

Sensorineural Hearing Loss

Sensorineural loss is the most common type of hearing loss. A sensorineural hearing loss is defined as damage.

Combined Hearing Loss

Combined hearing loss describes the occurrence of conductive hearing loss that also has a sensorineural component.

Symptoms Of Hearing Loss

The symptoms of hearing loss can vary depending on the type of hearing loss, the cause of hearing loss, and the degree of loss. In general, people who have hearing loss may experience any or all of the following :

Difficulty understanding everyday conversation

Having to turn up the TV or radio

Avoidance of social situations that were once enjoyable

A feeling of being able to hear but not understand

Asking others to repeat often

Tinnitus, or ringing and/or buzzing sounds in the ears

Increased difficulty communicating in noisy situations like restaurants, group meetings

Muffling of speech and other sounds.

Hearing Loss Causes

The cause of a particular hearing loss is important to understand since it factors heavily into determining the right treatment.
There are many causes of hearing loss and some causes are responsible for only certain types of hearing loss.
Hearing loss can be caused by any of the following :
Certain Medications
Trauma Or Injury To The Head
Prolonged Exposure To Excessively Loud Noise
A Single Episode Of Acoustic Trauma
Certain Illnesses Such As Mumps, Meniere’s Disease, Otosclerosis Or Autoimmune Disease
A Tumor On The Acoustic Nerve Or Acoustic Neuroma

Hearing Loss Causes

The cause of a particular hearing loss is important to understand since it factors heavily into determining the right treatment.
There are many causes of hearing loss and some causes are responsible for only certain types of hearing loss.
Hearing loss can be caused by any of the following :

Certain Medications

Trauma Or Injury To The Head

Prolonged Exposure To Excessively Loud Noise

A Single Episode Of Acoustic Trauma

Certain Illnesses Such As Mumps, Meniere’s Disease, Otosclerosis Or Autoimmune Disease

A Tumor On The Acoustic Nerve Or Acoustic Neuroma

FAQ - Hearing Loss

What are the different types and styles of hearing aids?

Today’s hearing aids are smaller and designed to be discreet. Many are nearly undetectable even close up. One model actually sits completely in the canal of your ear and is practically invisible when worn. Alternately, fashionable, meant-to-be seen hearing aids in fun color combinations and exotic flowery flourishes are available.

What are the most common hearing loss causes?

There are several causes. The main ones include excessive noise, infections, genetics, birth defects, infections to the head or ear, aging, and reaction to drugs or cancer treatment.

Wouldn’t I already know if I had hearing loss?

Few physicians routinely screen for hearing loss. Since most people with hearing impairments hear fine in quiet environments, it can be a very difficult problem for your doctor to recognize.

Doesn't hearing loss only affect old people?

Hearing loss can occur at any time, at any age. In fact, most people with hearing loss (65%) are younger than age 65! There are six million people in the U.S. ages 18-44 with hearing loss, and around one-and-a-half million are school age.

How do I know hearing aids will work for me?

Consumers who buy hearing aids are entitled to a trial period, usually 30 days from the time of fitting. During this trial, your hearing care professional will work with you to ensure your complete satisfaction. You will have follow up visits to fine-tune your hearing aids, and if necessary, make any changes to the style or circuitry.